Archive for ultraviolence

Outrage

Posted in Japanese Cinema with tags , , , , , , , , , , on January 10, 2012 by Cristina Blackwater

Outrage – 2010

 

plot: The boss of a major crime syndicate orders his lieutenant to bring a rogue gang of drug traffickers in line, a job that gets passed on to his long-suffering subordinate. The plot concerns a struggle for power amongst Tokyo’s Yakuza clans, today just as likely to be playing the stock market as shaking down pachinko parlors, over which the Sanmo-kai clan holds sway in the face of constant betrayal and ever-changing allegiances. Sanmo-kai chairman Ototomo (played by Kitano himself) learns that his henchman Ikemoto has struck an alliance with the drug-dealing Murase family, and is not best pleased, to say the least. The ensuing retaliation triggers an orgy of killings, territorial invasions and score settling while law enforcement officers, too corrupt to intervene

 Kitano is fucking back with a vengeance. let’s all bow and thank the japanese film gods. after laying off the yakuza genre for nearly 10 years, master Takeshi Kitano brings us Outrage, once again starring himself as the main character. Outrage follows the ins and outs of Yakuza politics of revenge and atonement between bosses, brothers, and cohorts, and an unstoppable backstabbing bloody avalanche of awesome.

 

 

 

the winning recipe here is the ultra violence topped off with irresistible black humor. you gotta love it when the fatalities and horrible, blood filled yakuza situations you are presented with also make you let out an out loud chuckle or two. i mean there’s a reason why Tarantino loves this guy so much, right? right.

 

 

one way Outrage differs from Kitano’s other notorious yakuza movies, is that his character, and generally the story itself, lacks his distinctive outcast-inner struggle, the nuances in the people involved are put aside for a more straight forward kind of story telling, but after all, as Kitano remarked publicly about his making of Outrage, he is giving the people what they want – no pretense of artistic embellishments, but rather blunt, cruel acts of violence of the professional criminal devoid of any romanticism.

 

 

so sit back and enjoy the bloody ride, and then, if you’re hungry for more, remember this is the same guy who brought us masterpieces such as Brother, Hana-bi, and Boiling Point. it’s never too late for a good re-ash.

Battle Royale

Posted in Japanese Cinema with tags , , , , , , , , on January 7, 2010 by Cristina Blackwater

Battle Royale – Batoru Rowaiaru – 2000

Plot: In the beginning of the 21st Century, the economy of Japan is near a total collapse, with high rates of unemployment and students boycotting their classes. The government approves the Battle Royale Act, where one class is randomly selected and the students are sent to an island wearing necklaces with few supplies and one weapon. After three days, they have to kill each other and the survivor wins his or her own life as a prize. The 42 students of a ninth-grade class are selected to participate in the survival game and abducted while traveling in their bus. Under the command of their former teacher Kitano, they have to eliminate each other following the rules of the sadistic game where only one wins

It’s Japanese Classics Revival here at Zombie Cupcakes land!

Being born and raised in a part of Europe where J culture is extremely popular, i kind of took movies like this for granted, like it was pointless to bring them up because “everybody has seen them already”.

It was then brought up to my attention that maybe a fresh viewer who is introduced to asian cinema for the first time might not exactly be so familiar with Akira, Tetsuo, Boiling Point, or in this case Battle Royale.

If i was ever to make a top 10 must see Japanese movie-list, this one would definitely be a part of it.

But first things first: Batoru Rowaiaru is a 2000 Kinji Fukasaku movie based on the shockwave novel by Koushun Takami, which is a bestseller in Japan, and which has become very controversial in a very short time. The plot is simple – a group of students are set to kill each other until only one survives – and stars the one and only Takeshi Kitano as the merciless teacher who’s behind the whole ordeal

Battle Royale is a fever-pitched exercise in the theory that reality itself is so close to absurdity that you need twist your picture of it only slightly to send it over the edge into nightmarish satire. There is no real meaning to the violence of it: just plain, bloody, and ultra-violent.

The main chatacters are Shuya Nanahara and Noriko Nakagawa, two students who are secretly in love but never revealed it to each other before, and a third guy, Shogo Kawada, a survivor from a previous Battle Royale Program. But the thing is, even though she is in the movie only for a few minutes, the movie features a way more popular face, Takako Chigusa, played by Tarantino’s favorite japanese lady, Chiaki Kuriyama (aka Kill Bill’s Gogo). She wore that yellow one piece suit first!

The movie is brilliant in its simplicity, the satire against modern society is dry, bloody, and extremely effective.

And did i mention super-cute Japanese Schoolgirls (in uniforms!!) butchering each other?

Many other japanese movies involving schoolgirls and blood will be made after this, but Battle Royale will always be the “serious one”, the one that is not so gory it makes you laugh, but the one that’s brilliantly real even in such an unrealistic setting. If you’re approaching J-Cinema, and you want to do it right, make sure this movie is a part of your viewing experience.

Bronson

Posted in Other Cinema with tags , , , , , , , , , , on January 1, 2010 by Cristina Blackwater

Bronson – 2009

Plot: In 1974, a hot-headed 19-year-old named Michael Peterson decided he wanted to make a name for himself and so, with a homemade sawn-off shotgun and a head full of dreams he attempted to rob a post office. Swiftly apprehended and originally sentenced to 7 years in jail, Peterson has subsequently been behind bars for 34 years, 30 of which have been spent in solitary confinement. During that time, Michael Petersen, the boy, faded away and ‘Charles Bronson,’ his superstar alter ego, took center stage. Inside the mind of Bronson – a scathing indictment of celebrity culture

Bronson is a 2009 biographical crime film directed by Nicolas Winding Refn, about the life of notorious prisoner Michael Gordon Peterson, played by Tom Hardy. It is, as the poster says, “A Clockwork Orange of the 21st century”.

I couldn’t have explained it better with a thousand words. As a matter of fact, the entire time i was watching it that’s exactly what i was thinking. I stumbled upon this movie thanks to one of my favorites movie-geek friends, Kevin (@The_Cameo) on one of our many – and very nerdy – movie stuff conversations. I really need to thank him because his recommendation just gave me about 90 minutes of pure, gold, and good old ultraviolence:

Everything about this movie is pretty much amazing. Camera works, soundtrack, performances. Tom Hardy, who met the real Charlie Bronson to prepare for the movie, did an outstanding job portraying England’s most popular inmate.

I think I’m gonna let the pictures speak for me, because as of right now I still have the rush and the thrill that would make my words just a blurry combination of ways to repeat the word “awesome” over and over again.

Alternatively, there’s always Wikipedia: Born into a respectable middle class family, Peterson would nevertheless become one of the country’s most dangerous criminals, and is known for having spent almost his entire life in solitary confinement. Bronson is narrated with humour, blurring the line between comedy and horror. It explores the idea of a man’s violence as his alter-ego.

Also, i instantly developed the biggest crush on Earth for this guy, and just so you know, he’s totally gonna be my next boyfriend. That’s the extent of my “expert point of view” on this movie, Bronson.

No, but really, you HAVE to see this movie. You just have to.

It will make you scream “Alex!” and “Ludwig Van!!” a few times.

Guaranteed.